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ALL ABOUT CATS

On our "ALL ABOUT CATS" pages we have tried to cover as much information as we can on a variety of cat related issues including information about taking care of your cat, cost involved, and health issues to be aware of.

Text written in white links either to areas of our website or to other websites with information on the subject we think you might find useful.

The information on these pages has been sourced from a variety of literature as well as personal and professional resources but we cannot guarantee the accuracy of any of the information nor take any responsibility for the content.

You should always consult your breeder, seller, vet and other appropriate professional before making any decisions.

 
 
 

INTERESTING CAT FACTS

Scientific name: Felis catus

Size: The average house cat is eight to eleven pounds, but you can have a petite six-pound calico or a big 15-pound Maine Coon cat.

Lifespan: Indoor cats regularly live to be 15, and some kitties live even longer.

Colors/varieties: There are many different breeds of cats from the hairless Sphynx and the fluffy, puffy Persian to the silvery spotted Egyptian mau. But the most popular kitties of all are non-pedigree that includes brown tabbies, black-and-orange tortoiseshells, all-black cats, the long hair, striped kitties with white socks and everything in between!

History: Cats were domesticated, or bred to be friendly to humans, sometime between 4,000 and 8,000 years ago, in Africa and the Middle East. Small wild cats started hanging out where humans stored their grain. Can you think of a better place to find mice?! When humans saw cats up close and personal, they began to admire felines for their beauty and grace and the rest is history ;-)

 

TOP TIPS WHEN CARING FOR YOUR CAT

  • Outfit your cat with a collar and ID tag that includes your name, address, and telephone number. No matter how careful you are, there's a chance your companion may slip out the door—an ID tag greatly increases the chance that your cat will be returned home safely.
  • Have your cat microchipped
  • Take your cat to the veterinarian for regular check-ups.
  • Spay or neuter your cat. This will keep her healthier and will reduce the problem of cat overpopulation.
  • Give your cat a nutritionally balanced diet, including constant access to fresh water. Ask your veterinarian for advice on what and how often to feed your pet.
  • Train your cat to refrain from undesirable behaviors such as scratching furniture and jumping on countertops. Contrary to popular belief, cats can be trained with a bit of patience, effort, and understanding on your part.
  • Groom your cat often to keep her coat healthy, soft, and shiny. Although it is especially important to brush long-haired cats to prevent their hair from matting, even short-haired felines need to be groomed to remove as much loose hair as possible. When cats groom themselves, they ingest a great deal of hair, which often leads to hairball's.
  • Set aside time to play with your cat. While cats do not need the same level of exercise that dogs do, enjoying regular play sessions with your pet will provide him with the physical exercise and mental stimulation he needs, as well as strengthen the bond you share.
  • Be loyal to and patient with your cat. Make sure the expectations you have of your companion are reasonable and remember that the vast majority of behavior problems can be solved.
 

WHY DO CATS PURR

The mystery about why cats purr has fascinated owners for many years. There is no definitive answer to why cats purr, but there are a few theories that have been made. One is that the effect is soothing to humans, but one thing is clear – when a cat purrs it is not always because they are happy. 

The house cat's purr is unique, however other animals such as cheetahs, and puma purr as well. Kittens learn to spin back in their first days of life, even before they open their eyes, and a mother often purrs with her babies. Cats even purr when they hurt are fear or close to death. 

We often associate their purring with satisfaction, but it could be more generally associated as a signal of different things. A mother and her babies purring to communicate their location, as kittens are born blind. Two cats that nurture each other, can use purring to communicate feelings of satisfaction. 

A cat purrs even when it is nervous, it may be a way of comforting itself, as we may sing or hum to ourselves when we're anxious. Such communication signals can even be transmitted to humans - such as mutual satisfaction between cat and owner while you nurture a cat in your lap for example. 

As far as how a cat purrs, researchers can only guess, but most agree that the laryngeal muscles and the larynx respond to neutral impulse from the brain. There are even rumors that the cat's purr has to do with the release of endorphins. 

A cat's purr is interesting as it continues throughout the full respiratory cycle. A cat continues to spin, while they are breathing in and out. In contrast to a "Meow", which is more related to speech, a purr seems to have a sustained rhythm, until a cat decides to turn it off. 

If a cat has a sick throat, they will produce a different sound, and may have trouble swallowing and breathing properly, as it causes them to shut their mouths. They have also sometimes developed nerve damage, which has paralyzed larynx or a tumor or polyp, restricting free airway. In these cases, endoscopy of the area is needed. Surgery may be necessary to open airways and improve breathing. 

Whatever the reasons for cat purring, it is helpful to know that just the act of purring, covers a wide range of feelings in cats. This helps us to appreciate this unique form of expression as more than a pleasant sound, which lowers our blood pressure and soothes our ears.

 

CAN CATS TOLERATE MILK

It is often debated among cat owners whether cats can tolerate milk. Indeed, there are cats who tolerate milk, while others can not.

The same problem is known in humans and here we know what the cause is. When the milk comes down in the small intestine, it decomposes to absorption into the body. For this to occur, milk is degraded by an enzyme called lactase.

If this enzyme is not present, the cat will not be able to absorb the milk and you will often see that the cat gets diarrhea in varying degrees. The reason for this type of diarrhea is that lactase deficiency leads to a acid reaction in the colon, causing the absorption of water to decrease.

What can I do?
If you offer your cat dairy products and diarrhea occurs, it may be because lack of lactase. 
If you provide food free of lactase so food that does not containing milk or milk products, then the diarrhea will stop. If this happens, then it may be dairy products, which cause diarrhea, so you should avoid these.

 

CAT BEHAVIOUR AND TRAINING

To learn the cat's behavior before you start training with them would be a good idea for anyone who want to train a cat's behavior. 

A cat can jump and always lands on his feet this is a natural instinct for a cat. When a kitten is first born, the kitten's paw pads are not yet developed for landing. It takes about 7 weeks to develop the paw pads to a stage where it is ready for landing on. The cat's bone structure is unique compared to other animals because their bones are flexible. A cat has no collarbone, which allows them to be able to twist and bend their bones. 

A cat can jump from a short distance without any consequential damages. In other words, nothing happens by a cat jumping from low heights as a table or a scratching post, but never let a cat jump from extreme heights, as it will inflict the damage. 

Cats have a unique hearing, they are able to hear high tones and sounds, like opening a door or a can of food. Cats also have unique sense of smell.

The reason that a cat will scratch or urinate on the floor, rubbing them self against a door or furniture is that the cat leave their scent in the area so they will be able to come back and know that they've been there before with other words they marked their territory. 

Additionally, if another cat or other animals coming into the area, the cat will know this. Cats can also smell with their mouths. There is a gland called Jacobson's organ - this is a small bag in the upper mouth filled with blood, when the cat opens it’s mouth and upper lip, scents carried passes by the small bag, which then carries this scent on to the cat brain. It is seen most often in males after a female has urinated.

Understanding of the cat's natural needs and instincts will help you to train your cat's behavior. When you train your cat, there are some things you should also take into consideration. Aggression, especially in older cats, can be caused by illness or other cats in the home. You should contact your veterinarian to get a checked up.

Depression and anxiety could play another role in training your cat. If a cat is separated from its latest owner, the cat can become depressed. If you think your cat has depression or high anxiety, you should urgently take the cat to the vet. Vets can talk to you about some of the things that can cause this, and a help list to the cat. There are medications that a vet can prescribe the cat to alleviate depression and anxiety.

Of cause never hit a cat as punishment, the cat begins to fear you and fear will create a behavior in the cat as you will not be able to control or to get away again. When they do something that is not acceptable, either ignore the problem or if you catch them in the act, you can use sounds to change their behavior, or simply with a specific pitch to say "NO".

You should start training your cat or kitten the same day you invite him/her into your home.

Cats need healthy relationships with their owner.

 

FAQ'S - HEALTH & SAFETY

Q: My cat has become un-clean. What can I do?

A: Un-cleanliness in cats may be due either to disease of the urinary tract (ex. a cystitis) or a "protest" from the cat's side due to a change in the cat's daily life (new family, new litter, new cleaning of the litter box, etc.). Disease must always be excluded before the problem can be called behavioral. This is done by examination of the cat and his urine. Is urine normal, clarified the problem and solving this in consultation with the vet.

Q: My Persian cat regularly throws up hairball's. What can I do?

A: There has recently been introduced a diet of both Hill's and IAM's to help with the problem. The feed composition is that it carries up to 80% more hair through the gut than normal feed. Alternatively you can give your cat cats malt a couple times a day.

Q: Can we vaccinate cats against leukemia?

A: Most cases of leukemia in cats caused by a virus. This virus can be vaccinated against with a vaccine called Fevaxyn. For the cat to be effectively protected against the disease, so it must have two basic vaccinations 4 weeks apart and then an annual re-vaccination. It is advisable to test the cat for leukemia before vaccination. Leukemia Vaccination can usefully be done while the cat is vaccinated against cat and cat flu.

Q: How can you prevent urinary tract stones in cats?

A: The vast majority of cases of urinary tract stones in cats are caused by an incorrect amount and balance of minerals in the diet. It is mainly males who have problems with urinary tract stones. The male has a long, narrow urethra, where the stones easily gets stuck. The female has a shorter and wider urethra, which making it easier for stones to pass through the urinary tract.

To prevent the formation of urinary stones, it is very important that you give your cat a food with a balanced and controlled mineral content. It can be a specific FCD or Prescription Diet C / D, which you can buy from your vet. If you are unsure that you give your cat a good fodder, so ask your veterinarian.

Q: When should I neuter my cat?

A: It has been generally recommended that both male and female cats should be mature before surgery was performed, i.e. castration (males) or sterilization (females) at 6-7 months of age. The timing of cat sexual maturation depends somewhat on what time of year they are born when the brighter times, starting in January-February, affecting it. Breed Cats maturing generally later than domestic cats.

Recent studies indicate, however, that no untoward side effects by performing neutralization were before sexual maturation. In males have been nervous during development of the diameter of the urethra, if castration occurred very early. This has proved to be the case. In the female there are even studies that suggest that a very early sterilization could prevent formation of tumors in the mammary gland in later life.

Very early neutralization of 3-5 months of age may be an anesthetic problem, especially among very small breeds.

There is also an ethical discussion about neutralization of animals. Birth of a very large number of homeless kittens, especially in urban areas seems to justify this intervention in the natural order (in most people's eyes).

Q: My outdoor cat has regularly worm in the stool. How do I tackle it?

A: You should consult your veterinarian for worm problem. Outdoor cat are often repeatedly infected with worms, especially if they are good at catching mice and other small rodents. The problem can be addressed by your veterinarian examine your cat and take a stool sample in connection with the annual health check. Are there signs of worm infection, the veterinarian can prescribe the right medicine. Often it will be necessary to treat outdoor cat 1 quarterly.

Q: My cat has had kittens again. How soon after birth should I start with the pill?

A: First and foremost, it is recommended that you consider getting the cat spayed instead. It is a safer method, since you may forget to give pills or cat can throw them up - and there may be side effects from the pill form of development of uterine inflammation and tumors of the mammary gland. Many cats are still the pill, and if you choose to continue with it, start already 1-2 weeks after birth.

Q: I have moved into an apartment on the 3rd floor with my cat. How do I prevent it from falling from the balcony or out the window because it is very interested in the birds outside?

A: Some cat owners are rebuilding the balcony to a kind of aviary using chicken wire net to enclose the whole area. This will prevent the cat from fall out while the balcony is still an open area. Especially in the summer your cat will enjoy to lie in the open air. As for windows, here you could fir a flat fly screens. You will have to check both regularly though to make sure no holes appear.

 

PAIN SCALE

Many cat owners find it difficult to assess when a cat is in pain. Pain can be assessed by a pain scale from 0 - 10

Pain Stage 0 - no signs of pain. Here, the cat will run normally, play, eat, skip and jump. They sleep normally, the pulse is normal, the cat take care of its coat as normal. Appetite, feces, urine and grooming seem normal.

Pain Stage 1 - probably no pain. The cat's behavior is as described above, but the owner can be a little bit unsure if there are signs of pain.

Pain Stage 2 - minor discomfort. There is perhaps a little bit of lameness, the cat shows minor signs of discomfort when its body is touched.

Pain Stage 3 - light pain. The cat show signs of lameness, may show pain from the abdomen. The cat seems a little bit defeated, shakes and quivers and is not interested in eating.

Pain Stage 4 - moderate pain. If you touch the cat in the place where it hurts, it will show obvious pain. Often the cat will lick himself in the place where the pain comes from. There may be signs of lameness, and the cat may tremble and / or shake more than usual. In pain stage 4 the cat will often walk with a hanging tail, and it is not uncommon for the cat walk and make small miau’s.

Pain Stage 5 - moderate pain. The cat may not like to move. It seems more defeated. No appetite, and if you touch the painful area will typically try to avoid being touching possibly by showing teeth and at worst bite or strike at the owner. Some cats can make squealing noises if you touch and / or move it. Are there obvious signs of pain from the belly, the cat will show abdominal “protection” (abdominal muscles will not relax when you squeeze their bellies). Cats in pain Stage 5 should be treated by the vet.

Pain Stage 6 - stronger moderate pain. The cat will usually howl and scream for no apparent reason. If it tries to move there will be screaming or complaining noises from it. This pain stage requires veterinarian treatment.

Pain Stage 7  - moderate to severe pain. The cat does not seem interested in their surroundings, will not move unaided cries when moved, and have an incessant screaming and / or complaining sound. Pain Stage 7 requires veterinary treatment and / or admission to veterinary hospital.

Pain Stage 8  - sharp pain. The cat has an obvious “complaint” it does not notice the owner's presence, and if the owner is trying to reassure the cat, it is indifferent. The cat may wander restlessly about, it might make complaint sounds when someone is approaching. Pain Stage 8 requires veterinary treatment and / or admission to veterinary hospital.

Pain Stage 9 - severe and unbearable pain. The cat will tremble constantly, especially - if you touch the spot where the pain comes from. The cat is difficult to monitor and regardless of what the owner might do, the cat will show pain response, either by failing to move by quiver by giving persistent complaint sounds. Pain Stage 9 requires immediate veterinary treatment.

Pain Stage 10 - unbearable pain. The cat has a pervasive and persistent moaning. It exhibits strong pain reaction to the touch, wherever you touch the cat will exhibit a strong, screaming and / or complaining sound. The whole body shakes. In pain stage 10 the cat should immediately cat anesthetized and treated intensively in veterinary hospital.

 

BREEDS & BREEDERS

Abyssinian American Bobtail American Curl American Shorthair
American Wirehair Anatolian Asian Australian Mist
Balinese Balinese Traditional Bengal Birman
Bombay British Shorthair Burmese Burmilla: see Asian
Chardani Chartreux Chausie Colorpoint LH
Colorpoint SH Cornish Rex Cymric: see Manx Devon Rex
Don Sphynx / Hairless Egyptian Mau European Burmese Exotics
Havana Brown Himalayan Japanese Bobtail Javanese
Korat LaPerm Maine Coon Manx
Munchkin Nebelung Norweigan Forest Cat Ocicat
Oriental Longhair Oriental Shorthair Persian Peterbald
Pixie-Bob Ragamuffin Ragdoll Russian Blue
Savannah Scottish Fold Selkirk Rex Serengeti
Siamese Traditional Siamese Siberian Singapura
Snowshoe Sokoke Somali Sphynx
Spotted Mist Tiffanie: see Asian
Thai Bluepoint Tonkinese
Turkish Angora Turkish Van    
Abyssinian
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Abychat Cats
www.abychatcats.co.uk/favorite.htm

1 September 2005

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Abfab Somalis
www.abfab.somalis.btinternet.co.uk
Small cattery based in the South East of England on
the coast of Kent, The Garden of England.
5 September 2005
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Crystal Cats
www.crystalcats.co.uk
Hello and welcome to my website! I have been
breeding Abyssinian's since 1991 and breed most
colors except sex-linked. My aim is to breed
healthy, well-adjusted kittens who are a joy to
share your home with!
5 September 2005
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Janalise Abyssinians
www.abyssinian-cats.co.uk

5 September 2005

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Rintinaby Abyssinians
www.rintinaby.co.uk
I have had the pleasure of sharing my home with my two Abyssinians for nearly a year. Tufty & Smokey have the run of the house and don't they just know it! They get on well together and work as a team to get up to mischief. They came to me as kittens and it is lovely to see how their own individual personalities and characteristics have developed.
5 September 2005

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Saladin Abyssinians
www.saladinabyssinians.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
We breed Abyssinians (Abys) for type,
temperament, health and purrability. We specialise in breeding Usual, Sorrel and Blue Abys.
5 September 2005

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Silversmoke Abyssinians
www.silversmokeabyssinians.co.uk
We live in Kent with our nine Abyssinians, two
bobtail boxer bitches called Bobbie and Becky
- and a number of other assorted creatures
5 September 2005

AMERICAN BOBTAIL

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Aloe way American Bobtail
http://www.americanbobtail.com
We raise American Bobtail kittens in our home with the family. Our Goal is to Raise Healthy,Gorgeous AMERICAN BOBTAIL Kittens for your Family.
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American Bobtail
http://www.americanbobtail.org
We offer you the most information about the breed, and what has been involved in making it what it is today. We are here to educate you on what these unique cats are all about! Thank You for your interest, be sure to check out our Breeder's Page for a breeder near you.
26 October 2005

AMERICAN CURL
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Curlessence Tripod
http://curlessence.tripod.com

27 October 2005
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BENGAL
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Applegarth Bengals
www.applegarthbengals.co.uk
My name is Libby and I would like to welcome
you to Applegarth Bengals. Having fallen in love with this extraordinary breed several years ago I decided to breed Bengal cats from my family home in Kent.
5 September 2005
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Alsoomse Bengals
www.alsoomsebengals.com
OUR AIM is to breed that wild look whilst having Stunning, Healthy and Wonderful Temperament Cats for breeding/showing and pets.
5 September 2005

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Baraboo Bengals
www.baraboo-bengals.co.uk
As reputable Bengal breeders, all our Bengal kittens are reared in a genuine home environment. Here they come into contact with our other cats, including Russian Blues, and our dogs. This ensures a wonderful temperament and social skills and
therefore makes a very affectionate cat. Our kittens are ready to go to their new homes at
13 weeks old.
5 September 2005

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Bangal Kat
www.bengalkat.dk
The Bengal is a relatively new cat breed in Europe. On this page you can read about it, and see pictures of our cats.
5 September 2005
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ByeZira Bengals
http://www.byezirabengals.co.uk
Welcome to ByeZira Bengals, we are a UK Breeders based
in Folkestone, Kent, Producing Pedigree, TICA Registered
BENGAL KITTENS. All kittens are raised indoors as part of
our family. We provide a safe loving environment until they
are ready to leave for their new homes.
20 Sep 2011

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Chrisjay Bengals
www.chrisjay-bengals.co.uk
We specialise in brown spotted. We are a small breeder who believe that quality is more important the quantity. All our kittens are from show winner stock.
5 September 2005

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Dreamstone Bengals
http://www.dreamstonebengals.co.uk
Dreamstone is a UK Staffordshire
based breeder of outstanding quality bengals. Breeding only from top bloodlines (see pedigrees), concentrating on brown spotted, snows, and marbled bengals.
26 October 2005

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Gaylee
www.gaylee.co.uk

5 September 2005

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Inahoi Bengals
www.inahoibengals.co.uk


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Jayuzuri Bengals
www.jayuzuribengals.co.uk
We are specialist Bengal breeders in breeding rarer, high quality snow Bengals. We also breed beautiful brown spotted and brown marbled Bengal cats in Bristol, UK
1 September 2005
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Sarikakings Bengals
www.bengalkats.co.uk

5 September 2005

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Tuhina Bengals
http://www.tuhinabengals.com/
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Queen Anne Cats
http://www.queenannecats.co.uk
Specialising in Stunning Silver Bengals, Brown and Snow Bengals from TOP US Bloodlines. New silver lines now here - completely unrelated to Silvergene
26 October 2005

BIRMAN
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Elmridge Cats
http://www.elmridgecats.co.uk

We bred our first litter of Birmans in 1981, and since 1983 have been breeding under the ELMRIDGE prefix
26 October 2005

BRITISH SHORT HAIRED
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Loismhor
http://www.loismhor.com
We have been breeding British Shorthair kittens for several years after many years of breeding Labradors. My husband uses his design talents in our cat houses and runs – a far cry from sophisticated laboratory equipment !
26 October 2005
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Sarikakings British Shorthairs
www.bengalkats.co.uk

5 September 2005

BURMESE
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Birman
www.birma.ch
German site
5 September 2005

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Ayshazen
www.ayshazen.co.uk

5 September 2005

CHARDANI
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Ragdoll Cats
www.ragdollcats.dk



EGYPTIAN MAU
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Elmridge Cats
http://www.elmridgecats.co.uk

We bred our first litter of Birmans in 1981, and since 1983 have been breeding under the ELMRIDGE prefix
26 October 2005

EXOTICS
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Appassionata
www.appassionata.btinternet.co.uk

5 September 2005
  
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Tracylooe
www.tracylooe.co.uk
Bi-Color: Vans, Harlequins & Calicos including Tabby & Whites, Silver Tabby and Smokes. Specialising in Chocolate & Lilac Series. GCCF & CFA Registered. FAB PKD tested Cattery. FeLv & FIV tested.
5 September 2005

MAINE COON
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Lynxelot
http://www.lynxelot.com
OUR LOVELY NEW GIRL FROM ESCAPE'S
CATTERY IN FINLAND HAS ARRIVED THANKS
TO JAANA FOR THIS BEAUTIFUL YOUNG QUEEN
26 October 2005

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Sue Ragdandy
http://hometown.aol.co.uk/mdheames/index.html
We have been breeding beautiful cats since 1989. All our adult cats have access to our enclosed garden which provides them with the opportunity to run, jump, socialise, and use their natural hunting instinct.
26 October 2005
MIS

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Cat Breed Info
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/breedercats.htm

27 October 2005

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Linked Posted:

Breed List
http://www.breedlist.com
the oldest dedicated pedigreed cat breeder referral service on the World Wide Web Founded and operated by a cat breeder for cat breeders, the FBRL has been in constant existence since November 1994, and hosts over two thousand listings in over 20 countries.
PERSIAN
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Appassionata
www.appassionata.btinternet.co.uk

5 September 2005
  
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Tracylooe
www.tracylooe.co.uk
Bi-Color: Vans, Harlequins & Calicos including Tabby & Whites, Silver Tabby and Smokes. Specialising in Chocolate & Lilac Series. GCCF & CFA Registered. FAB PKD tested Cattery. FeLv & FIV tested.
5 September 2005

PIXIE BOB
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Anson Road Cats
http://www.ansonroad.co.uk
Big bear paws, wild looking faces and a naturally short tail. Super intelligent but they think they are a dog. Sweet, affectionate and independent.
26 October 2005
RAGDOLL
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Ragdoll Cats
www.ragdollcats.dk


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Sue Ragdandy
http://hometown.aol.co.uk/mdheames/index.html
We have been breeding beautiful cats since 1989. All our adult cats have access to our enclosed garden which provides them with the opportunity to run, jump, socialise, and use their natural hunting instinct.
26 October 2005
TONKINESE
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Ayshazen
www.ayshazen.co.uk


 


THE AREAS WE COVER FOR CAT CARE INCLUDE

EC1, Clerkenwell, Finsbury, Hoxton, St Lukes
EC2, Shorditch
E3, Mile End, Bow, Bromley-by-Bow, Old Ford
E5, Clapton, Hackney Marshes, Lea Bridge, Lower Clapton, Upper Clapton
E8, Hackney, Dalston, Kingland
E9, Victoria Park
N1, Angel, Barnsbury, Canonbury, Clerkenwell, De Beauvoir Town, Hoxton, Islington, Pentonville, Shoreditch
N4, Finsbury Park, Manor House,
N5, Highbury
N6, Highgate
N7, Holloway
N8, Crouch End, Hornsey, Turnpike Lane, Stroud Green
N10, Muswell Hill
N11, Friern Barnet
N13, Palmers Green
N14, Southgate
N15, West Green, Seven Sisters
N16, Stamford Hill, Stoke Newington, Shacklewell
N18, Edmonton
N19, Hornsey Rise, Archway, Tufnell Park,
N20, Whetstone
N21, Grange Park
N22, Wood Green, Alexandra Palace,
NW1, Regents Park, Camden Town
NW2, Brondesbury, Cricklewood, Neasden,
NW3, Hampstead, Swiss Cottage
NW5, Kentish Town
NW6, West Hampstead, Kilburn, Queens Park,
EN1, Enfield, Enfield Town

SW19 / SW18, Southfields

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